English (ENG)

ENG-101  Reading Writing & Reasoning  (3 credits)  

This course is designed for incoming freshmen who demonstrate a need for improving their reading, writing and reasoning skills necessary for college success. Required for students who have an SAT EBRW Sub-score 450 or below or ACT 18 or below.

ENG-111  Introduction to Literature: Acad Writing  (3 credits)  

This course is an introduction to literature and the fundamentals of academic writing. Students learn the skills essential to college success:critical reading and analytical thinking, interpretation, scholarly discussion and collaboration, effective oral presentation, composition of writing for both readers and listeners.

ENG-112  Humanities Seminar  (3 credits)  

This course teaches academic writing skills based on a humanities topic, thematically linked to the D'Youville general education core. Topics will vary by instructor and will be approached from literary or historical perspectives, with a common focus on cultural studies. Offered both semesters. Crosslisted with HIS-112 beginning Fall 2019.

ENG-189  Topics in Critical Inquiry  (3 credits)  

Critical inquiry is the process of gathering and evaluating information, ideas, and assumptions from multiple perspectives to produce well-reasoned analysis and understanding, and leading to new ideas, applications and questions. This course is intended to introduce new students to intellectual inquiry at the university by engaging them in in-depth study of a single topic utilizing a variety of perspectives and methods. The course emphasizes the essential role of critical and creative thinking to their lives as students, citizens, future professionals, and productive members of their communities.

Course Types: Topics
Corequisite(s): Take ENG-189L

ENG-189L  Topics in Critical Inquiry - Lab  (1 credits)  

Critical inquiry is the process of gathering and evaluating information, ideas, and assumptions from multiple perspectives to produce well-reasoned analysis and understanding, and leading to new ideas, applications and questions. This course is intended to introduce new students to intellectual inquiry at the university by engaging them in in-depth study of a single topic utilizing a variety of perspectives and methods. The course emphasizes the essential role of critical and creative thinking to their lives as students, citizens, future professionals, and productive members of their communities. The lab for the course is an interdisciplinary application lab, wherein students work in teams to demonstrate what they learned in the didactic portion of the course through the creation of a project, presentation, art object/installation, play, podcast, short film, co-authored reflection (debrief) on a simulation experience, etc. Faculty who design the didactic portion of the course together will design this portion as a 5-week experiential component of the course, which might include community partnerships or field trips. Students who take the course and lab will be invited to display their project results in a one-afternoon presentation at the end of each semester (to be arranged by college events personnel).

Course Types: Topics
Corequisite(s): Take ENG-189

ENG-191  English As a Second Language  (3 credits)  

This is a two-semester course designedfor students whose native language is one other than English and who have some previous knowledge of English. Instruction is given in order to understand, speak, read and write English. Individual conferences are part of this course. Credit is not applied to academic concentration or related field.

ENG-192  English As a Second Language  (3 credits)  

This course is a continuation of ENG-191.

Prerequisite(s): Take ENG-191

ENG-201  English Literature Beginnings to 1798  (3 credits)  

This survey course focuses on dominant literary trends and major authors, such as Chaucer, Spenser, Donne, Jonson, Milton, Bacon and Pope.

ENG-202  19th and 20th Century English Literature  (3 credits)  

This survey course focuses on dominant literary trends and major authors, including the Romantics, the Victorians and modern authors such as Yeats, Eliot, Joyce and Lawrence.

ENG-203  Short Story  (3 credits)  

This course is a systematic presentation of the ways of understanding and appreciating fiction. Students analyze, step-by-step, the meaning and techniques of a rich and varied selection of short stories.

ENG-205  Literature and the Brain  (3 credits)  

The nature of consciousness, the neuroscience of the brain, the (real or imagined) mind/brain divide, the possibilities of artificial or non-human intelligence, the capacity for language and creative expression, and the meaning and limits of personal identity have been the focus of a wide range of literary texts, films, and other cultural productions. Students in this course will investigate these puzzles through literature, film, painting, music, and/or popular culture. In joining a study of the workings of the brain with a study of how those workings manifest in literature and the other arts, we will embark on a journey through the aesthetic, emotional, ethical, and cultural dimensions of some of the most significant questions in neuroscience and cognitive science.

ENG-210  Science Fiction  (3 credits)  

This course is an exploration of science fiction as a form of social critique, with an emphasis on themes such as ecology, time travel, mythology, responsibility of the scientist, social relationships, utopias, the alien encounter, and the human and inhuman.

ENG-211  American Literature Beginnings to 1865  (3 credits)  

This is a survey course in American literature from its beginnings through the Civil War. Representative authors include Franklin, Irving, Emerson, Thoreau,Hawthorne, Poe, Melville and Whitman.

ENG-212  American Literature 1865 - Present  (3 credits)  

This is a survey course in American literature from the Civil War to the present day. Representative authors include Twain, James, Chopin, Eliot, Pound, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, Hughes, Bellow, Baldwin, Oates and Morrison.

ENG-213  Studies in Drama  (3 credits)  

This course examines the expression of human concerns in dramatic form. It is designed to make play-giving and play-reading enjoyable and enriching experiences. Selected plays are examined with emphasis on 20th century playwrights.

ENG-215  World Literature I  (3 credits)  

This survey course in literary classics offers a variety of genres from non-English speaking cultures, from the ancient Greeks and Romans to continental European literature before 1800. A representative sampling of pre-19th century literature from the Far East will also be included.

ENG-216  World Literature II  (3 credits)  

This is a survey of recent literature, drawn from outside the English-speaking world, which both contributes to and critiques the dominant 20th century Anglo-American tradition.

ENG-217  Studies in Poetry  (3 credits)  

This course explores the nature, variety and values as well as the enriching experience and understanding of poetry. A study of selected poems principally by modern poets.

ENG-218  Minority Voices in American Literature  (3 credits)  

This is a survey of American literature that is written by and about ethnic minorities, including African Americans, Native Americans and others.

ENG-221  The Novel  (3 credits)  

This genre course in the novel focuses on the enduring human themes and concerns expressed in the dominant literary form of this age.

ENG-237  Introduction to Literary Criticism  (3 credits)  

This course will provide students with the necessary skills to work consciously and effectively within the discourse of the discipline. Emphasis will be given to the following: further refinement of close critical reading skills; understanding of literary terms; understanding of basic critical and theoretical terms, concepts and methodologies; and understanding of genres.

ENG-300  Women Writers  (3 credits)  

This course brings together the artistic vision and contributions of outstanding women writers. The focus is on how women writers view women and the concerns of their time. Possible authors include Gwendolyn Brooks, Virginia Woolf, Katherine Mansfield, Joyce Carol Oates, Flannery O’Connor, Katherine Anne Porter, Eudora Welty and Sylvia Plath.

ENG-301  Romantic and Victorian Literature  (3 credits)  

This course explores the fiction, prose, and poetry of the Romantic and Victorian period (1785-1900). Readings will vary to highlight the crucial historical events of the nineteenth century, including the rise of the British Empire, the effects of the Industrial Revolution, the emergence of the middle and working classes, and women's changing social roles.

ENG-302  Shakespeare  (3 credits)  

This course explores Shakespeare's dramatic and poetic presentation of human experience in all its ambiguities and contradictions. The course will investigate language, sources, historical context, staging and performance history.

ENG-308  Medieval Literature  (3 credits)  

This course explores the language, themes and context of Old English and Middle English literature. Old English texts, read in modern translation, often include the prose of King Alfred, Beowulf, and shorter poems such as The Wanderer and The Dream of the Rood. Selections from Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales are read in their original Middle English, while texts such as the Book of Margery Kemp, the Chester Play of Noah's Flood and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight are modernized.

ENG-309  Renaissance Literature  (3 credits)  

This course examines the writings of one of the richest periods of English literature. The emergence of humanism, the rediscovery of classical texts and the exploration of new lands inspired eminent writers, such as, Spenser, Sidney, Marlowe, Jonson, Donne, Herbert, Marvell and Milton. The background of the Protestant Reformation, Tudor politics and the Civil Wars informs our close reading of a variety of texts, from love sonnets to the epic, from the demonic to the utopian.

ENG-310  Eighteenth Century Literature  (3 credits)  

Students will study the prose and poetry of the neoclassical period from its rise to prominence in the Restoration Period through the 18th century. Prerequisites:

ENG-311  Themes in American Literature  (3 credits)  

This course is an in-depth reading of several major American writers who explore a common literary theme.

ENG-312  Topics in British Literature  (3 credits)  

ENG 312 explores a particular theme, topic, or genre in the literature of British writers. Contact instructor for details.

ENG-313  Contemporary Writers  (3 credits)  

This course is a study of post-1950 literary works that include popular fiction writers, poets and playwrights that reflect contemporary thought and life.

ENG-316  British Modernism  (3 credits)  

This course will examine the work of British Modernist writers from approximately 1908-1939. In addition to close critical analysis of the literary texts, the course will explore the cultural contexts of the movement including its precursors and its influence on British culture.

ENG-317  Myth and Literature  (3 credits)  

This couorse examines connections between myth and literature across genres and historical periods.

ENG-318  Modern Continental Literature  (3 credits)  

This course is designed for students who are interested in European literature, but who want to elect a course given in English. Based on themes or works of universal interest, it gives students an opportunity to broaden their cultural horizons.

ENG-322  Studies in the Novel  (3 credits)  

This course is an in-depth examination of selected novels within their historical and theoretical contexts, and focuses on dominant thematic or formal concerns.

ENG-329  Major Author  (3 credits)  

This course covers the career and works of a single significant author.

ENG-332  Creat Writing II  (3 credits)  

Students are given advanced work in generic types of creative writing and develop a manuscript in one or more genres. The course may be taken as humanities fine arts core option.

ENG-342  Magical Realism  (3 credits)  

This course will trace the development of the Latin American fiction style known as magical realism from the early 1920s to contemporary novels. Writers may include Carpentier, Arlt, Lispector, Bombal, Borges, Garcia-Marquez and Allende.

ENG-346  African American Literature  (3 credits)  

This course is a survey of African American literature from the earliest colonial settlements to the present. The course will cover oral story telling traditions, vestiges of African culture in slave folktales, the relevance of music in African-American literary art, the affects of emancipation and the struggle for civil rights on African American literature, and look at how that literature both represents and affects pertinent issues, such as power, race and gender within the African-American literary community.

ENG-347  Spirituality in American Literature  (3 credits)  

This course will be a survey of authors exploring personal spirituality as national identity and vice versa. This is not a course about conventional religious history, nor will we study religious writers of any religious denomination per se. The readings will be primarily a survey of Transcendentalist writers and their spiritual/intellectual descendents with focus on how American writers have sought to integrate individualism with spirituality.

ENG-389  Special Topics Study Abroad  (3 credits)  

ENG-390  Special Topics Study Abroad  (3 credits)  

ENG-406  Critical Theory  (3 credits)  

Students practice the application of the principles of literary criticism and of the norms of aesthetic values in literature.

Prerequisite(s): Take 2 semesters of literature.

ENG-409  Variable Topics in Literature  (3 credits)  

This is a variable topic seminar that deals with selected themes or authors as announced when the course is offered.

ENG-410  Variable Topics in Literature  (3 credits)  

This is a variable topic seminar that deals with selected themes or authors as announced when the course is offered.

ENG-432  Creat Writing III  (3 credits)  

Students are given in-depth work in types of creative writing and develop a manuscript in a chosen genre.

ENG-444  Internship  (3-12 credits)  

The English internship is a variable credit (3-12 hours) required course that encourages juniors/seniors to investigate a career through a placement in a professional setting or in development of future projects (graduate study). This allows students to work under guidance of an immediate supervisor and/or a college faculty sponsor.

ENG-450  Senior Project Portfolio  (3 credits)  

This course offers students the opportunity to produce a professional writing portfolio. The portfolio will reflect all the major and/or relevant areas of writing expertise.

ENG-479  Independent Study  (3 credits)  

Qualified students may investigate selected topics with the permission of an instructor. The titlereflects the course content.